THREE TYPES OF CUNEIFORM Sumerian, Akkadian & Babylonian Tablets museum replicas

35.00$

Cast stone replicas of authentic Mesopotamian baked clay cuneiform tablets with clear & precise examples of early Sumerian, Akkadian & latterday Babylonian Cuneiform. Brown ochre stone tablets, quartzite-limestone composite, approx 30 x 35 mm (1 x 1.5 inches).

Mesopotamian Baked Clay Tablet Replicas

Cast stone replicas of authentic Mesopotamian baked clay cuneiform tablets with clear & precise examples of early Sumerian, Akkadian & latterday Babylonian Cuneiform. Brown ochre stone tablets, quartzite-limestone composite, approx 30 x 35 mm (1 x 1.5 inches).

TABLET ONE
Baked clay tablet inscribed in Old Sumerian cuneiform from the 3rd Dynasty of Sumeria, reign of Ur-Nammu 2047-2030 BC.

Ur-Nammu was the founder of the Third Dynasty of Ur in Sumer who initiated the Ur III Period (2047-1750 BC) also known as the Sumerian Renaissance. He is best known as the king who composed the first complete law code in the world, the Code of Ur-Nammu. He is also credited as the builder of the Great Pyramid Ziggurat of Ur, which still rises above the ruins of the city today.

TABLET TWO
Akkadian clay tablet from the reign of Narim-Sin 2250 BC.

Founded by Sargon the Great around 2040 BC, the Akkadian Empire was the first actual “empire” of Mesopotamia. Centered in the city of Akkad, it is famously referred to in the Bible. The Empire united Semitic Akkadians and blue-eyed Sumerians under one rule. In 2250 BC King Narim-Sin expanded the empire to its largest size, sending military expeditions as far south as Dilmun and Magan (modern-day Bahrain and Oman) ruling for 50 years.

TABLET THREE

Old Babylonian cuneiform document from 1900 BC, from the earliest days of Babylon, citing the name of the Amorite King Sumu-La-El, Son of Sumuabum, who founded the First Dynasty of Babylon in 1894 BC.

Different from the sharper, more complex style of Old Sumerian, the tablet provides an excellent example of the simpler, abbreviated cuneiform adopted by the Assyrians in Babylon for their own Semitic tongue.

HISTORICAL BACKGROUND
Upon the collapse of the 3rd Dynasty of Ur in 2004 BC, the Semitic Amorites (the “westerners”) seized control of Sumerian cities in southern Mesopotamia including Isin, Larsa and Babylon. Cuneiform continued to be used for writing the Assyrian and Babylonian dialects which descended from Akkadian. During the Old Babylonian Period literary activity flourished, with scribes composing and recording religious, poetic and scientific works in both Sumerian and Akkadian cuneiform. Babylon remained an important cultural and trading center until sacked by the Hittites around 1595 BC.

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